Day 11: Overcoming Resistance

My friend Chelsea’s Kitchen Sink!

My friend Chelsea’s Kitchen Sink!

Finally mopped the bathroom!

Finally mopped the bathroom!

The main lesson I’ve learned so far in my month of cleaning is that the mental resistance is way more intense than the actual task. Each night after I finish cooking, I look at the messy kitchen and think “ugh, no” and want to go in the other room and read. Usually when this happens, I follow the path of least resistance and ignore the task at hand. This week, I am following the path of most resistance to push through the thing I don’t want to do.

I’ve even set a timer a few times to see how long it takes and guess what? The whole task of cleaning, drying, and putting the dishes back takes 15 minutes. That’s it! I’m very good at spending hours/days/years thinking about a task and avoiding it instead of just doing it. Isn’t that so silly?! Isn’t that so normal?

I’ve literally avoided mopping for a whole year because I create a mental scenario of how annoying it’s going to be. My thought bubble shows me having to move alllllllllllllllllllll the furniture aside, vacuum the whoooollllleeee house first, set up the mop, then actually mop, then avoid the floors for foreeeevvvvvveeeer, then put everything back. Isn’t that sooooooo daunting?

Or, I can just do it and it’ll probably take 15 minutes.

The satisfaction that’s waiting on the other end of the seemingly daunting task at hand far surpasses the gnawing pressure of procrastination.

I can’t believe washing dishes just set me up for this whole year of experiments! Overcoming resistance = satisfaction with life. Avoiding resistance = prolonged pain. Screw the thoughts and just do it.